Ocean Action Hub

26 Apr 2017 - Flip-flops, one of the most ubiquitous types of ocean pollution globally, are being recycled into colourful artwork by a Kenyan company to raise awareness.

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Indonesia - The Indonesian Waste Platform (IWP) was established in October 2015 as a 'hub' connecting stakeholders who are involved in solutions on land-based and marine-based waste from a

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5 December 2016 - Marine debris is negatively affecting more than 800 animal species and causing serious losses to many countries' economies, according to a United Nations report launched

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The report has been prepared pursuant to paragraph 309 of General Assembly...
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How one company in Kenya turns ocean pollution into colorful artwork

26 Apr 2017 - Flip-flops, one of the most ubiquitous types of ocean pollution globally, are being recycled into colourful artwork by a Kenyan company to raise awareness.

26 Apr 2017 - Flip-flops are one of the most common types of pollution found in oceans around the world, and one company in Kenya is raising awareness by recycling them into colorful pieces of art.

Ocean pollution continues to endanger marine populations worldwide, and the amount of plastic and trash entering the water has reached staggering levels. Some estimates have suggested that by 2050 there will be more plastic than fish in the oceans.

Ocean Sole, a social enterprise located in Nairobi, Kenya, has been cleaning up discarded flip-flops that wash ashore from the Indian Ocean for nearly two decades.

In an effort to bring attention to this global issue, the company said it aims to recycle 400,000 flip-flops per year by salvaging the materials and producing vibrant works of art. As for what type of artwork can be made, they stress that there is no limit to their creativity.

“Making products out of flip-flops is endless,” said Erin Smith, chief sole mate at Ocean Sole. “If you can imagine it, you can make it.”

The creative team at Ocean Sole designs products ranging from key rings and bracelets to furniture and sculptures. Much of their wall art showcases animals such as lions, bison, pandas, gorillas and endangered species around the world.

Their most notable designs are called “grand masterpieces,” which are sculptures that can reach lifelike proportions. One example is a giraffe sculpture that stood 18 feet in height. Ocean Sole has even received requests to make large-size interactive chess pieces for boutique hotels.

Five percent of the company’s profits from recycled flip-flop products and 10 percent of its production costs are spread back into the Ocean Sole Foundation, which works with conservationists, industries, scientists and other non-profits organizations to promote marine conservation. 

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Indonesian Waste Platform

Indonesia - The Indonesian Waste Platform (IWP) was established in October 2015 as a 'hub' connecting stakeholders who are involved in solutions on land-based and marine-based waste from a

Indonesia - The Indonesian Waste Platform (IWP) was established in October 2015 as a 'hub' connecting stakeholders who are involved in solutions on land-based and marine-based waste from all sectors and regions in Indonesia and abroad.

IWP promotes and facilitates cross-sector and cross-border collaboration, the forming of a common-shared vision, strategy and action plans.

For more information see: 

IWP website

IWP's Facebook page

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Oceans and the law of the sea - Report of the Secretary-General

The report has been prepared pursuant to paragraph 309 of General Assembly resolution 69/245 of 29 December 2014, with a view to facilitating discussions on the topic of focus at the sixteenth meet

ing of the United Nations

Open-ended Informal Consultative Process on Oceans and the Law of the Sea, on the theme entitled “Oceans and sustainable development: integration of the three dimensions of sustainable development, namely, environmental, social and economic.”

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New UN report finds marine debris harming more than 800 species, costing countries millions

5 December 2016 - Marine debris is negatively affecting more than 800 animal species and causing serious losses to many countries' economies, according to a United Nations report launched

5 December 2016 - Marine debris is negatively affecting more than 800 animal species and causing serious losses to many countries' economies, according to a United Nations report launched today.

The report, Marine Debris: Understanding, Preventing and Mitigating the Significant Adverse Impacts on Marine and Coastal Biodiversity found that the number of species affected by marine debris has increased from 663 to 817 since 2012. It also warned that this type of waste, which is mostly made of plastic, is an increasing threat to human health and well-being, and is costing countries billions of dollars each year.

Source: www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=55724