Ocean Action Hub

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Blue Economy approach is based on a vision of "improved wellbeing and social equity, while significantly reducing environmental risks and ecological scarcities" (UNEP 2013). As such, Blue Economy initiatives support the creation of a low-carbon, resource-efficient, socially-inclusive society. The achievement of global sustainability goals feeds local objectives, and conversely, global successes are built on effective local implementation. As such, the services, benefits and values documented by initial Blue Economy efforts were and are seen as crucial not only for local communities and coastal states, but also the world as a whole (UNEP, 2015, p.8).

The fact that oceans and seas (as well as rivers, waterways and estuaries) matter for sustainable development is undeniable. Two thirds of the earth's surface is covered by water. The oceans1 are widely accepted as the incubator of all life forms. They are a fundamental yet delicate part of the Earth's biosphere and essential to sustaining life on the planet. Oceans serve a variety of purposes, all critical to the sustenance and preservation of human life. Among other things, they provide food and minerals, generate oxygen, absorb greenhouse gases (GHG), mitigate climate change, influence weather patterns and temperatures and serve as highways for human transport and sea-borne trade (UNCTAD, 2014, p.1).

The link between humans and the oceans has been fundamental to the development of human civilisation. Today, more than 3 billion people live in close proximity to the coast. This number is bound to rise with population growth, urban drift and increasing demand for accommodation close to oceans and seas. The high level of dependence of humans on marine assets is putting unprecedented pressure on marine ecosystems to service the ever-increasing demands of the growing global population. There is therefore an increasing need for regulation on the basis of an appropriate balance between the demand for oceans' natural resources and their sustainability (UNCTAD, 2014, p.1).

Healthy oceans and seas are essential to a more sustainable future for all. This is particularly true in the case of Small Island Developing States (SIDS). However, oceans are facing significant existential ecological risks that can negatively affect the social and economic prospects of all countries, particularly SIDS and coastal States that are acutely dependent on oceans. Some of these risks are a rise in sea levels due to climate change; acidification of oceans resulting from increased emissions of carbon dioxide; overexploitation and poor management of marine resources, including fisheries; wastewater runoff; deposit of pollutants into waterways; and the compromise of the seabed as a consequence of mineral resource prospecting and extraction (UNCTAD, 2014, p.1).

Latest

15 Aug 2017 - Covering 70 percent of Earth's surface, the world's oceans are vast and deep. So vast, in fact, that nearly every coastal country has the potential to meet its own domestic seafood needs through aquaculture.

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11 Aug 2017 - It’s no fluke: Fish populations are on the move, chasing cooler marine temperatures. At Rutgers, scientists track their alarming migrations.

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9 Aug 2017 - PARTNERSHIP is one of the cornerstones for successfully implementing the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

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2 Aug 2017 - More than half of the world’s oceans belong to no one, which often makes their riches ripe for plunder.

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In June 2017, the United Nations hosted the first Ocean Conference to solidify a global approach for the management and conservation of the oceans.

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28 Jul 2017 - ¿Cómo se diseña una Política Oceánica que respalde la conservación de los mares y el uso sostenible de los recursos que provee? Esa fue la pregunta que articuló el taller internacional organizado por el Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores (MINREL) con apoyo del Programa de las Naciones Unidas para el Desarrollo (PNUD) en Chile, que contó con la asistencia de expertos y representantes diplomáticos procedentes de Argentina, Australia, Colombia, Nueva Zelandia y Perú el pasado 27 de julio en Santiago.

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13 July 2017 - New initiative covers a wide swathe of research interests, including climate, marine litter, ocean observation, food security, fisheries management, and ocean technology.

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This technical abstract is based upon the First Global Integrated Marine...
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Indonesia

Asosiasi Usaha Homestay Lokal Kabupaten Raja Ampat (AUHLKRA) is one of the Equator Prize Winners 2017. Here's why.

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Kenya

Mikoko Pamoja is one of the Equator Prize Winners 2017. Here's why.

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Thailand

Community Mangrove Forest Conservation of Baan Bang La is one of the Equator Prize Winners 2017. Here's why.

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Kenya

The Kuruwitu Conservation & Welfare Association (KCWA) is one of the Equator Prize Winners 2017. Here's why.

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