Ocean Action Hub

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Register your commitment to achieve #SDG14!

Blue Economy approach is based on a vision of "improved wellbeing and social equity, while significantly reducing environmental risks and ecological scarcities" (UNEP 2013). As such, Blue Economy initiatives support the creation of a low-carbon, resource-efficient, socially-inclusive society. The achievement of global sustainability goals feeds local objectives, and conversely, global successes are built on effective local implementation. As such, the services, benefits and values documented by initial Blue Economy efforts were and are seen as crucial not only for local communities and coastal states, but also the world as a whole (UNEP, 2015, p.8).

The fact that oceans and seas (as well as rivers, waterways and estuaries) matter for sustainable development is undeniable. Two thirds of the earth's surface is covered by water. The oceans1 are widely accepted as the incubator of all life forms. They are a fundamental yet delicate part of the Earth's biosphere and essential to sustaining life on the planet. Oceans serve a variety of purposes, all critical to the sustenance and preservation of human life. Among other things, they provide food and minerals, generate oxygen, absorb greenhouse gases (GHG), mitigate climate change, influence weather patterns and temperatures and serve as highways for human transport and sea-borne trade (UNCTAD, 2014, p.1).

The link between humans and the oceans has been fundamental to the development of human civilisation. Today, more than 3 billion people live in close proximity to the coast. This number is bound to rise with population growth, urban drift and increasing demand for accommodation close to oceans and seas. The high level of dependence of humans on marine assets is putting unprecedented pressure on marine ecosystems to service the ever-increasing demands of the growing global population. There is therefore an increasing need for regulation on the basis of an appropriate balance between the demand for oceans' natural resources and their sustainability (UNCTAD, 2014, p.1).

Healthy oceans and seas are essential to a more sustainable future for all. This is particularly true in the case of Small Island Developing States (SIDS). However, oceans are facing significant existential ecological risks that can negatively affect the social and economic prospects of all countries, particularly SIDS and coastal States that are acutely dependent on oceans. Some of these risks are a rise in sea levels due to climate change; acidification of oceans resulting from increased emissions of carbon dioxide; overexploitation and poor management of marine resources, including fisheries; wastewater runoff; deposit of pollutants into waterways; and the compromise of the seabed as a consequence of mineral resource prospecting and extraction (UNCTAD, 2014, p.1).

Latest

20 Jun 2018 - This year’s World Oceans Day, observed annually on 8 June, featured the release of publications and the launch of campaigns to tackle plastic pollution.

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15 Jun 2018 - In many ways, the public’s awareness about the importance of ocean health is where we were 15 years ago with climate change.

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8 Jun 2018 - In celebration of World Oceans Day, a global campaign is being launched by UNDP and partners to invite people from all walks of life, to volunteer to take action.

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6 Jun 2018 - UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres has warned that there would be more plastic than fish by 2050 if the present trends continue.

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5 Jun 2018 - Managed marine protected areas are an effective tool in coastal ocean conservation. They are also ripe to be included in investment structures. The upsides for everyone may help push the protected area of the world’s seas from 2% to 30% by 2030.

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Within the context of the 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda and CDB’s...
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1 Jun 2018 - The ocean is an abundant resource and therefore has the potential to expand existing sectors as well as nurture entirely new ones – if we manage it appropriately.

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31 May 2018 - New software targets the most abundant fishing grounds and reduces catch of unwanted or protected species using satellite data, maps and observations.

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30 May 2018 - In line with SDG 14, development of Blue Economy sector must also promote social inclusion while ensuring environmental sustainability.

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Join the UN Global Compact for the launch of its Action Platform for Sustainable Ocean Business.

Event Date:
07/06/2018 - 09:00 to 08/06/2018 - 18:00
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21 May 2018 - Peter Thomson on how a sustainable blue economy will feed and support future generations.

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18 May 2018 - A wide consortium of global tuna buyers, NGOs, and fishing industry associations have issued a call to regional fishery management organizations that they adopt more stringen

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