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Land-based sources (such as agricultural run-off, discharge of nutrients and pesticides and untreated sewage including plastics) account for approximately 80% of marine pollution, globally. Marine habitats worldwide are contaminated with man-made debris. Oil spills remain a concern, though actual spills have decreased steadily for several decades.

Excessive nutrients from sewage outfalls and agricultural runoff have contributed to the increasing incidence of low oxygen (hypoxic) areas known as dead zones, where most marine life cannot survive, resulting in the collapse of some ecosystems. There are now close to 500 dead zones with a total global surface area of over 245,000 km², roughly equivalent to that of the United Kingdom. The excess nitrogen can also stimulate the proliferation of seaweeds and microorganisms and cause algal blooms. Such blooms can be harmful (HABs), causing massive fish kills, contaminating seafood with toxins and altering ecosystems.

Litter can accumulate in huge floating garbage patches or wash up on the coasts. Light, resistant plastics float in the Ocean, releasing contaminants as they break down into micro-particles that animals mistake for food. Fish and birds can choke on these particles, get sick as they accumulate toxins in their stomachs, or become entangled in larger debris.

As the world saw in 2010, the Gulf of Mexico deep-water oil spill had a devastating effect on the entire marine ecosystem, as well as the populations that depend on the marine areas for their livelihoods. Smaller oil spills happen every day, due to drilling incidents or leaking motors, negatively impacting birds, marine mammals, algae, fish and shellfish.

SOURCE: UNESCO website

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23 Oct 2017 - All sea life will be affected because carbon dioxide emissions from modern society are making the oceans more acidic, a major new report will say.

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19 Oct 2017 - The Ellen MacArthur Foundation’s New Plastics Economy design challenge has awarded $1 million to six innovators who are taking the plastic out of packaging and redesigning the ways people consume common products.

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18 Oct 2017 - Ocean and Climate Youth Ambassadors and staff from the Peace Boat visited UNDP headquarters to learn about UNDP’s work on ocean conservation and sustainable development.

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17 Oct 2017 - Maui Ocean Center continues its environmentally-friendly platform with the discontinuation of single-use plastic straws.

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The Ocean is the blue heart of our planet … This video opened the 4th International #OurOcean conference (Malta, 5-6 October 2

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The 2017 edition of the Our Ocean Conference – An Ocean for Life - builds on...
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6 Oct 2017 - A global conference, Our Ocean, to better protect marine life has raised more than $7 billion and won commitments to protect huge swathes of the Earth's oceans.

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5 Oct 2017 - Confusion surrounding Kenya’s new ban on plastic bags may jeopardize the

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4 Oct 2017 - If plastic usage continues at current rates, our children’s children are going to be deprived of the chance to experience the ocean’s majestic wilderness that mankind has taken for granted for generations.

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The September 2017 edition is dedicated exclusively to Ocean related matters...
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28 Sep 2017 - Hurricane Irma – one of the strongest on record to hit the Caribbean – recently scoured the islands leaving catastrophic damage in its wake.

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27 Sep 2017 - A high-level event on ‘SIDS Responding to Climate Impacts and Planning for a Sustainable Future' addressed initiatives, partnerships and actions that can help realize the SDGs.

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