Ocean Action Hub

Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) levels are rising as a result of human activities, such as fossil fuel burning, and are increasing the acidity of seawater. This process is known as ocean acidification. Historically, the ocean has absorbed approximately 30% of all CO2 released into the atmosphere by humans since the start of the industrial revolution, resulting in a 26% increase in the acidity of the ocean (average global decrease in ocean pH of about 0.1 unit).

Ocean acidification make it more difficult for the numerous organisms that fix calcium carbonate in their skeletons and shells to do so, and can also impact metabolic and reproductive processes in many marine species. By impacting marine ecosystems at multiple levels, it has significant potential to affect food security and livelihoods that depend upon healthy marine ecosystems. The economic impact of ocean acidification could be substantial.

Reducing CO2 emissions is the only way to minimize long-term, large-scale risks from ocean acidification (IGBP, IOC, SCOR, 2013, p. 1).

Latest

24 Mar 2017 - [Blog] The oceans sustain creatures we haven’t even discovered, but they also keep terrestrial life going.

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22 Mar 2017 – Over a year ago, on 20 February 2016, Tropical Cyclone Winston made a category 5 landfall along the north coa

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9 Mar 2017 - Farmers wanting to expand their land activities within the Great Barrier Reef catchment could be forced to offset any potential water pollution. 

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2 Mar 2017 - Scientists now understand how the carbon and methane emissions from our cars, livestock and electricity use 

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1 Mar 2017 - Iron particles generated by cities and industry are being dissolved by man-made air pollution and washed into the sea - potentially increasing the amount of GHG that our ocean can absorb.

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This first Ocean Literacy Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) aims to empower and...
Approved

28 Feb 2017 - Southeast Alaska Tribal Ocean Research is looking into the impact of ocean acidification in the region.

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28 Feb 2017 - Pledge to protect the ocean: Even by making a small change in your everyday life, you can achieve big results in helping to protect the ocean.

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28 Feb 2017 - Devastating coral bleaching almost certain to increase significantly in coming months, for 4th year running.

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23 Feb 2017 - Ocean scientists will test ways to limit damage from climate change, pollution and over-fishing to prevent destruction of all reefs by 2050.

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19 February 2017 Coral bleaching found near Palm Island as unusually warm waters are expected off eastern Australia, with areas hit in last year’s event in mortal dange

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16 February 2017 - Knowing the rate at which the oceans absorb carbon pollution is a key to understanding how fast climate change will occur. 

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