Ocean Action Hub

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The oceans are on the brink. Here are 3 ways to save them

20 Feb 2020 - Humanity is pushing the world’s oceans to the brink. But as grave as the situation is, experts say there is reason for hope.

20 Feb 2020 - Last year, a major United Nations climate report underscored a grim reality: Humanity is pushing the world’s oceans to the brink. 

By the end of the century, the report’s authors wrote, more of the world’s seas could be hot, acidic and lifeless — with catastrophic implications for marine life, the climate and for the food security of billions of people. 

But as grave as the report’s findings were, experts say, there is reason for hope.  

Through ambitious alliances and innovative engineering, conservationists are working tirelessly in 2020 to prevent the UN’s stark warning from becoming reality. Here are three approaches that Conservation International scientists are pioneering to conserve the oceans on a global scale. 

Mixing “green” with “gray” to protect coastal communities 

Limb for limb, the mangrove is perhaps the most important tree species on Earth

Around the globe, mangroves provide an estimated US$ 82 billion in flood risk prevention annually for coastal communities and store up to 10 times more carbon per unit area than terrestrial forests — yet nearly half of the world’s mangrove forests have been lost in the past 50 years.

To conserve these carbon powerhouses and the communities they protect from the imminent threats of climate change, Conservation International experts are working to combine mangrove restoration efforts with conventional engineering approaches through a technique called “green-gray” infrastructure. 

CONTINUE READING ONLINE HERE: https://www.conservation.org/blog/the-oceans-are-on-the-brink-here-are-3-ways-to-save-them

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Ocean pollution: 11 facts you need to know

15 Jul 2019 - Each year, we expose the world’s waterways to an increasing variety of pollutants — plastic debris, chemical runoff, crude oil and more.

15 Jul 2019 - Each year, we expose the world’s waterways to an increasing variety of pollutants — plastic debris, chemical runoff, crude oil and more.

Fortunately, it’s not too late to clean up our act. Conservation International shares the dirty truth about ocean pollution and how to make a difference.

  1. Oil spills aren't the big(gest) problem.

    Headline-grabbing oil spills account for just 12 percent of the oil in our oceans. Three times as much oil is carried out to sea via runoff from our roads, rivers and drainpipes.

  2. More plastic than fish.

    Eight million metric tons: That’s how much plastic we dump into the oceans each year. That’s about 17.6 billion pounds — or the equivalent of nearly 57,000 blue whales — every single year. By 2050, ocean plastic will outweigh all of the ocean’s fish.

  3. 5 garbage patches.

    There’s so much junk at sea, the debris has formed giant garbage patches. There are five of them around the world, and the largest — the Great Pacific Garbage Patch — includes an estimated 1.8 trillion pieces of trash and covers an area twice the size of Texas.

  4. Plastic poses a double danger.

    Ocean trash can be broken into smaller pieces — known as microplastic — by sun exposure and wave action, after which it can find its way into the food chain. When it eventually degrades (which takes 400 years for most plastic), the process releases chemicals that further contaminate the sea.

CONTINUE READING ONLINE HERE: https://www.conservation.org/stories/Pages/Ocean-Pollution-11-Facts-You-Need-to-Know.aspx

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To save marine habitats, conservationists find natural ally: surfers

21 May 2019 - Across the globe, hundreds of areas with world-class surfing waves also contain a variety of diverse marine species.

21 May 2019 - Across the globe, hundreds of areas with world-class surfing waves also contain a variety of diverse marine species.

Those waves mean big money — generating an estimated US$ 50 billion in economic activity from surfers.

But beneath those waves is something that’s also extremely valuable: a wealth of marine life.

For conservationists looking to protect these areas, it seemed natural to appeal to the people who greatly value them. Surfers make powerful advocates for the ocean, according to Scott Atkinson, senior technical adviser for Conservation International’s Hawai‘i Program and Coral Triangle Initiative. Recently, Human Nature caught up with Atkinson — a surfer himself — who spoke about a new partnership between CI and the Save The Waves Coalition to mobilize the surfing community to help protect marine areas.

CONTINUE READING ONLINE HERE: https://blog.conservation.org/2018/04/to-save-marine-habitats-conservationists-find-natural-ally-surfers/

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Protecting Africa’s oceans to secure our futures - Blue Oceans Conference, Liberia

21 Mar 2019 - This week, Conservation International is co-hosting the Blue Oceans Conference to bring attention to ocean conservation issues in Africa, with the Governments of Liberia and Sweden.

21 Mar 2019 - Editor’s note: This week, Conservation International is co-hosting the Blue Oceans Conference in Monrovia with the Governments of Liberia and Sweden to bring attention to ocean conservation issues in Africa, where they have been historically undervalued. Jessica Donovan-Allen, country director of Conservation International Liberia, spoke at the conference. Here is an edited version of her prepared remarks. 

I know personally the value of coastal conservation. I grew up the daughter of a fisherman in Cape Cod, Massachusetts, a child of the ocean. My family’s livelihood rose and fell with the tide, but it was — and remains — the action or inaction of businesses, governments and policymakers that most affect the relationship between oceans and the people connected to them through their livelihoods.

That’s why it is our goal at the Blue Oceans Conference — the first major environmental and marine conference in Western Africa — to confront the challenges of marine pollutionclimate change and sustainable fishing.

Conservation International is bringing our global expertise to work in 10 coastal communities to create sustainable livelihoods, fisheries and mangrove conservation. We are working to reverse harmful cycles and find sustainable alternatives.

Because when fisheries are poorly managed, they collapse.

When sea levels rise, coastal businesses disappear.

When coasts erode, houses crumble.

When species disappear, the whole composition of the ocean changes.

And when poor regulation is the enabler, local fishermen like my father are out of a job.

CONTINUE READING ONLINE HERE: https://blog.conservation.org/2019/03/protecting-africas-oceans-to-secure-our-futures/?utm_campaign=General&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter&s_src=twitter&s_subsrc=General_2017Mar20

PHOTO: Coast of Liberia. (© Trond Larsen)

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Blue Carbon Ecosystem – Fundamental for Ocean and Human Health

UN Headquarters, Conference Room B

Side Event hosted by Conservation International

UN Headquarters, Conference Room B

Side Event hosted by Conservation International

More details: https://oceanconference.un.org/index.php?page=view&type=20000&nr=1099&menu=3327&template=2456 

16 February, 13:15 - 14:30 EST

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Using the Ocean Health Index as an Integrated Tool for Implementing Ecosystem-Based Marine and Coastal Management Approaches Globally

UN Headquarters, Conference Room A

Side Event hosted by Conservation International

15 February, 13:15 - 14:30 EST

UN Headquarters, Conference Room A

Side Event hosted by Conservation International

15 February, 13:15 - 14:30 EST

More information: https://oceanconference.un.org/index.php?page=view&type=20000&nr=1059&menu=3327&template=2456

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