Ocean Action Hub

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Building back bluer

30 Sept 2020 - OECD - Here are four areas where governments can act now, using their COVID-19 recovery and stimulus packages to ensure that we “Build Back Bluer”:

30 Sept 2020 - OECD - Here are four areas where governments can act now, using their COVID-19 recovery and stimulus packages to ensure that we “Build Back Bluer”:

  1. Focus on financing. Aligning existing and future financial flows with sustainable ocean objectives, starting with the removal of potentially harmful subsidies and the taxation of environmentally harmful activities, is key. In many ways, the discussion around sustainable ocean finance is still at a relatively early stage, arguably where the clean energy finance discussion was about 10 years ago. We can draw on the lessons from other areas of green finance to leapfrog the ocean finance discussion to where it needs to be today. Innovative tools can support marine biodiversity financing, many of which can be drawn from terrestrial biodiversity protection. Such tools include blue carbon payments, blue bonds, insurance mechanisms, and debt-for-nature swaps.
  2. Rethink existing business models. This might mean focusing on more sustainable tourism – something that is better for the traveller, better for the ocean and better for local communities. This might also mean a fundamental rethink of the way we consume – a transformation to more circular economies – where waste is reduced and materials are re-used. This might also mean shifts in sectoral ocean policies, like policies to encourage stock growth and increase returns to fishers. It also might mean continuing to move towards reducing emissions from shipping, and rewarding companies that meet sustainability objectives.
  3. Strengthen science and innovation for the ocean. We need to have a better understanding of the ocean and our impacts on its ecosystems to inform policy decisions. The ocean has already provided us with essential tools to advance science:  horseshoe crab blood is needed to manufacture many vaccines – including, most likely, for a future COVID-19 vaccine (though unsustainable fishing practices has led to a population decline). But more than 80% of our vast ocean remains unexplored – who knows what kind of scientific breakthroughs may be lying in the deep blue sea. Government support for science and innovation, including through ocean innovation networks, can help.
  4. Implement a whole-of-government and whole-of-environment approach. The complexity of the ocean – overlapping jurisdictions, competing responsibilities and multi-sector co-ordination – requires a more holistic policy approach than we are currently seeing in many places. Responsibilities for the ocean at the national level are frequently divided between different ministries such as environment, transport, fisheries, development or tourism. Ensuring co-ordination is essential. Marine spatial planning is a critical tool in helping governments to enhance the institutional and governance arrangements in order to reconcile potentially competing uses for the ocean. The immensity of the challenge before us demands that our government bodies are rowing in the same direction.

CONTINUE READING ONLINE HERE: https://oecd-environment-focus.blog/2020/09/30/building-back-bluer/

Resource title

Sustainable Ocean for All

14 Sept 2020 - Harnessing the Benefits of Sustainable Ocean Economies for Developing Countries: Adopting more sustainable ways of managing the ocean is a global priority: protecting its he

14 Sept 2020 - Harnessing the Benefits of Sustainable Ocean Economies for Developing Countries: Adopting more sustainable ways of managing the ocean is a global priority: protecting its health will bring benefits to all. Developing countries face specific challenges, as many depend heavily on ocean-based industries and are overly exposed to the consequences of ocean degradation. Enhancing their access to science, policy advice and financing would allow them to tap better into the opportunities of a more sustainable ocean economy, including more decent jobs, cleaner energy, improved food security and enhanced resilience, while contributing to the protection of the world’s ocean. This report provides policy makers in developing countries, as well as their development co-operation partners with a wealth of fresh evidence on (i) the latest trends in selected ocean-based industries; (ii) policy instruments, including economic incentives, to promote ocean sustainability in various contexts; (iii) the first review of development finance and development co-operation practices in support of more sustainable ocean economies, including a discussion of how development co-operation can help re-orient private finance towards sustainability.

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OECD Review of Fisheries: Policies and Summary Statistics

The OECD Review of Fisheries (2015) provides information on developments in policies and activities in the fishing and aquaculture sectors of OECD countries and participating economies, mainly for

the period 2012-2013. This edition includes Argentina, the People's Republic of China, Chinese Taipei, Indonesia and Latvia.

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Green Growth in Fisheries and Aquaculture

This report summerises the current situation in fisheries and aquaculture, observing that in many parts of the world these sectors are at risk and do not reach their full potential.

However, the prospects for sustained growth are good if reforms along the lines suggested by the OECD Green Growth Strategy are undertaken. The report emphasises the need for a strong, science-based approach to stock management for resource sustainability, combined with a transparent and reactive policy development cycle to ensure that fisheries deliver maximum possible benefits. The report shows that improved regulation to deal with environmental externalities and space competition is key to unlocking future growth potential of aquaculture.

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The Ocean Economy in 2030

This report explores the growth prospects for the ocean economy, its capacity for future employment creation and innovation, and its role in addressing global challenges.

Special attention is devoted to the emerging ocean-based industries in light of their high growth and innovation potential, and contribution to addressing challenges such as energy security, environment, climate change and food security.

The report examines the risks and uncertanties surrounding the future development of ocean industries , the innovations required in science and technology to support their progress, their potential contribution to green growth and some of the implications for ocean management. Finally, and looking across the future ocean economy as a whole, it explores possible avenues for action that could boost its long-term development prospects while managing the use of the ocean itself in responsible, sustainable ways.

Resource title

Delivering on Sustainable Oceans for the SDGs

UN Headquarters, Conference Room 7

Side Event hosted by the OECD

UN Headquarters, Conference Room 7

Side Event hosted by the OECD

More details at: https://oceanconference.un.org/index.php?page=view&type=20000&nr=1144&menu=3327&template=2456

6:15 - 7:30 PM

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