Ocean Action Hub

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Environment at a Glance: OECD Indicators - Sustainable Ocean chapter

10 Jun 2020 - Includes key messages emerging from OECD’s ocean data.

10 Jun 2020 - Includes key messages emerging from OECD’s ocean data.

Progress towards a sustainable ocean economy can be assessed against domestic and international goals and commitments where these exist. All indicators presented here are relevant to Sustainable Development Goal 14:

Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development.

This page includes selected sustainable-ocean-related indicators published by the OECD and partner organisations; however, environmental and economic ocean data are immature compared to the terrestrial domain, and considerable data collection and integration challenges remain in order to comprehensively monitor progress towards a sustainable ocean economy. In particular, there is a need to fill data gaps related to measuring and monitoring the status of marine ecosystem services and to strengthen their valuation to identify priorities and address potential trade-offs.

CONTINUE READING ONLINE HERE: https://www.oecd-ilibrary.org/sites/1f798474-en/index.html?itemId=/content/component/1f798474-en#chapter-d1e5336

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OECD work in support of a sustainable ocean

10 Jun 2020 - To support government efforts to transition to a more sustainable ocean economy, the OECD is mobilising expertise across multiple policy fronts, covering environmental, economic, financial and social dimensions. Working with both developed and developing countries, the OECD aims to ensure that all societies can harness the benefits of the ocean on a sustainable and inclusive basis. Read more: www.oecd.org/ocean

10 Jun 2020 - The ocean covers two-thirds of the planet and is vital for human well-being. It provides invaluable ecosystem services, contributes to global food security, and offers immense opportunities for economic growth, employment and development. However, our ocean is under immense pressure from a wide range of human activities, and the environmental basis of many of these economic opportunities is threatened. This pressure will increase unless governments take bold action to ensure a sustainable use of the ocean, and the protection of its natural resources. To support government efforts to transition to a more sustainable ocean economy, the OECD is mobilising expertise across multiple policy fronts, covering environmental, economic, financial and social dimensions. Working with both developed and developing countries, the OECD aims to ensure that all societies can harness the benefits of the ocean on a sustainable and inclusive basis. Read more: www.oecd.org/ocean

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NEW: OECD Ocean policies portal & indicators now available online

10 Jun 2020 -  Includes the Sustainable Ocean Economy database and real-world ocean policies in practice

10 Jun 2020 -  Includes the Sustainable Ocean Economy database and real-world ocean policies in practice

ONLINE HERE: http://oecd.org/ocean

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Why should investors care about ocean health?
28 Jan 2020 - OECD - The Blue Economy relies on healthy ocean ecosystems for the abundance of resources that generate these incomes, and its future looks bleak. We need significantly more sustainable ‘blue’ investment to move from current destructive approaches to ocean assets, to a climate-secure and prosperous Blue Economy.

28 Jan 2020 - OECD - “The World’s Oceans Are in Trouble. And So Are Humans, Warns U.N. Report” – a blaring headline in Time Magazine just after the IPCC published their landmark report Oceans and the Cryosphere in September 2019. It highlights what scientists and NGOs have been shouting from the rooftops for years: human activity has put the global ocean in a dire state and by doing so is endangering planetary life as we know it. But how has it come this far? In addition to producing over half of the oxygen we breathe, being the largest carbon sink on the planet and a haven for biodiversity, a healthy ocean is a source of economic livelihoods for billions of people. The value of global ocean assets is estimated at over USD 24 trillion[1] making it the 7th largest economy in the world in GDP terms. Due to its integral role in the global financial and environmental ecosystems, the ocean is high on the international policy agenda[2] and its importance continues to grow. The global ‘Blue Economy’ is expected to expand at twice the rate of the mainstream economy until 2030[3], and already contributes USD 2.5 trillion a year in economic output.

However, the Blue Economy relies on healthy ocean ecosystems for the abundance of resources that generate these incomes, and its future looks bleak. For decades, harmful approaches have ranged from industrial fishing, depleting fish populations and destroying habitats, to using the ocean as a dumping ground for chemical and plastic waste. These approaches coupled with the damaging effects of climate change, have put the long-term survival of the ocean, and therefore its investment potential, at risk. Yet, we need significantly more sustainable ‘blue’ investment to move from current destructive approaches to ocean assets, to a climate-secure and prosperous Blue Economy.

CONTINUE READING ONLINE HERE: https://oecd-development-matters.org/2020/01/27/why-should-investors-care-about-ocean-health/