Ocean Action Hub

Resource title

Linking Small-Scale Fisheries to International Obligations on Marine Technology Transfer

This article analyses the interplay between inter-State obligations to increase scientific knowledge, develop research capacity and transfer marine technology in accordance with Sustainable Develop

ment Goal (SDG) 14.a, with a view to contributing to enhanced implementation of the international law of the sea (SDG 14.c), and providing access for small-scale artisanal fishers to marine resources (SDG 14.b). It proposes to do so by relying not only on the international law of the sea, but also on international biodiversity law (particularly the Convention on Biological Diversity) and international human rights law (particularly the human right to science). The article seeks to provide a reflection on the role of international law vis-à-vis the means of implementation for SDG 14 in synergy with other SDGs (particularly SDG 17 on ‘Partnerships for the Goals’). The reflection starts from observing an increasing linkage in international policy-making between technology transfer and small-scale fisheries, as well as related challenges and risks. The article then explores inter-State obligations related to technology transfer, focusing on the duty to cooperate and share information with a view to fleshing out the concept of partnerships for sustainable development. The article concludes by suggesting how the international law of the sea can be better implemented to enhance international cooperation on marine technology transfer to the benefit of small-scale fisheries, on the basis of the normative standards of the human right to science and the lessons learnt in international biodiversity law, with a view to furthering the synergetic implementation of the SDGs through genuine partnerships.

Resource title

Sharing the Benefits of Sustainable Fisheries: From Global to Local Legal Approaches to Marine Ecosystem Services for Poverty Alleviation (Science – Policy Analysis)

This science-policy working paper aims at investigating the connections and misalignments between scientific approaches and evidence related to sustainable fisheries, including marine habitat prote

ction, and policy debates, management approaches and scholarship in the context of ecosystem services. Within this broader context, the current analysis will first explore the science and policy of marine ecosystems and the “ecosystem approach”, then relate this to the scholarship and policy on “ecosystem services”, followed by connections with the literature on poverty alleviation.

The paper was developed in the framework of the MARINE BENEFITS research project, which explores whether and how the legal tool "fair and equitable benefit-sharing," as part of the ecosystem approach, can be integrated with the concept of marine ecosystem services to reduce the systemic poverty of coastal marine societies who depend upon marine resources for both food security and income generation.

Resource title

Connecting SDG 14 with the other Sustainable Development Goals through marine spatial planning

5 June 2017

Authors: Mara Ntona and Elisa Morgera, Strathclyde Centre for Environmental Law and Governance (SCELG), UK

5 June 2017

Authors: Mara Ntona and Elisa Morgera, Strathclyde Centre for Environmental Law and Governance (SCELG), UK

Abstract:

Despite the oceans’ incontrovertible contribution to the realisation of sustainable development, the importance assigned by the Millennium Development Goals to the conservation and sustainable use of marine resources was marginal. The adoption of a stand-alone Sustainable Development Goal on oceans (SDG 14) thus represents an important paradigm shift, insofar as it attempts to tackle some of the most intensely debated issues with relevance to marine environmental protection. However, SDG 14 remains one of the least well-integrated components of Agenda 2030, revolving almost exclusively around environmental considerations and omitting to address the wide range of socioeconomic issues raised throughout the goal-setting process. This gap risks undermining Agenda 2030’s internal consistency and, by extension, the realisation of its transformational vision.

Accordingly, this article endeavours to contribute to the scholarship on SDG linkages by conceptualising the intricate interconnections between SDG 14 and other Goals based on the diverse services provided to humankind by marine ecosystems, with a view to facilitating the transition to an “environment for well-being” approach to development. The article does so by relying on emerging guidance on marine spatial planning (MSP) under the Convention on Biological Diversity. By bringing ecosystem services and MSP into the SDG linkages discussion, this article seeks to investigate the role of the ecosystem approach, and of fair and equitable benefit-sharing within it, in fostering participatory ocean management tools. Ultimately, it seeks to assess to what extent MSP, building upon such tools and drawing on ecosystem services mapping, should be used to promote equity, prevent conflicts and enhance SDG synergies.

Resource title

Roundtable on Marine Biodiversity, UN Biodiversity Conference

Dec 2016 - Dr Daniela Diz, MARINE BENEFITS project Research Fellow, Strathclyde Centre for Environmental Law & Governance (SCELG), UK, shares insights into the negotiations and describes the highlights of the conference regarding marine biodiversity.

Major international negotiations on biodiversity were held in Cancun, Mexico, in December 2016. The UN Biodiversity Conference addressed a series of key environmental and societal challenges, including synthetic biology, marine biodiversity, and links between human rights and biodiversity (notably in relation to the traditional knowledge of indigenous peoples and local communities). In this video, Dr Daniela Diz, MARINE BENEFITS Research Fellow and Member of the Strathclyde Centre for Environmental Law & Governance (SCELG), shares insights into the negotiations and identifies the highlights of the UN Biodiversity Conference with regard to marine biodiversity.

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