Ocean Action Hub

Resource title

UN General Assembly agreed to hold 2nd UN Ocean Conference, 2-6 June 2020 in Lisbon

13 May 2019 - Co-hosted by Kenya and Portugal, the high-level conference will focus on solutions to achieve SDG 14.

13 May 2019 - Co-hosted by Kenya and Portugal, the high-level conference will focus on solutions to achieve SDG 14.

The General Assembly have decided to convene the meeting in Lisbon from 2 to 6 June 2020 that will focus on the conservation and sustainable use of the oceans, seas and marine resources in the context of the Sustainable Development Goals.

Acting without a vote, the Assembly adopted the draft resolution titled “2020 United Nations Conference to Support the Implementation of Sustainable Development Goal 14:  Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development” (document A/73/L.82).

Through the text, it decided that the overarching theme of the Conference – which follows up on the Ocean Conference held at Headquarters on 5 to 9 June 2017 - shall be “Scaling up ocean action based on science and innovation for the implementation of Goal 14:  stocktaking, partnerships and solutions” and encouraged participation at the highest level.

It also decided that the Conference shall adopt, by consensus, a “brief, concise, action-oriented and intergovernmentally agreed declaration” that will focus on, and highlight, science-based and innovative areas of action to support the implementation of Goal 14.  It is also to adopt a list of voluntary commitments for the implementation of Goal 14 registered after 9 June 2017 and announced at the Conference.

Through the resolution, the Assembly welcomed the offer by the Governments of Kenya and Portugal to co-host and assume the costs of the Conference and requested its President to organize a two-day preparatory meeting in February 2020.

CONTINUE READING ONLINE HERE: https://www.un.org/press/en/2019/ga12143.doc.htm

Resource title

Message from António Guterres, UN Secretary-General on World Wildlife Day 2019

26 Feb 2019 - WWD2019 is celebrated on 3 March on the theme of 'Life below water'

"Marine species provide indispensable ecosystem services. Plankton enrich the atmosphere with oxygen and more than 3 billion people depend on marine and coastal biodiversity for sustenance and livelihoods. Marine and coastal resources and the industries they support are estimated to be worth at least US$3 trillion a year, some 5 per cent of global GDP. 

Sustainably managing and protecting marine and coastal ecosystems are the objectives of Goal 14 of the Sustainable Development Goals. Today, ocean life is under severe pressure, ranging from climate change to pollution, the loss of coastal habitats and the overexploitation of marine species. Some one-third of commercial fish stocks are overfished, and many other species – from albatrosses to turtles – are imperilled by the unsustainable use of ocean resources.

The good news is that solutions are available. For example, where fisheries are managed scientifically, most fish stocks have a good chance of recovery. The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Fauna and Flora (CITES) is increasing regulation of marine species. And the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) is engaged in crafting a post-2020 global biodiversity framework."

CONTINUE READING ONLINE HERE: https://www.wildlifeday.org/2019/message-un-secretary-general-Antonio-Guterres

Resource title

Dress the world in wood, UN says in its ‘Forests for Fashion’ initiative
17 Jul 2018 - Clothing has been identified as a major polluter, with plastic microfibers ending up in the ocean as polyester, nylon and acrylic are washed.

17 Jul 2018 - The industry has been identified as a major polluter, with plastic microfibers ending up in the ocean as polyester, nylon and acrylic are washed.

The fashion industry is valued upward of 2.5 trillion dollars, and employs some 75 million people globally – so it makes good sense to shift textile production from fossil fuel-based synthetic fibers to renewable, biodegradable textiles, made from wood, according to a new United Nations initiative that aims to make forests literally more fashionable.

The United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (ECE)-FAO’s (Food and Agriculture Organization) “Forests for Fashion” initiative, links forest-based materials from sustainably managed forests, with the world of fashion.

“Sustainability of a society is both an individual and a collective responsibility,” said UN Development Programme (UNDP) Goodwill Ambassador Michelle Yeoh, at UN headquarters on Monday.

“The fashion industry is responsible for producing 20 per cent of global waste water and 10 per cent of the global carbon emissions – more than the emissions of all international flights and maritime shipping combined,” said the star of the movie Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon.

In addition, the textiles industry has recently been identified as a major polluter, with estimates of around half a million tonnes of plastic microfibers ending up in the world’s oceans as polyester, nylon or acrylic are washed each year.

“Fashion is often a synonym of dangerous working conditions, unsafe processes and hazardous substances used in production,” she continued, citing the cruel abuses of modern slavery and child labour.

Although the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are an ambitious blueprint for governments, Ms. Yeoh stressed that everyone must make a conscious choice to change habits and plan for the future.

“Today we count around 3.2 billion people in the global middle class,” she said. “By 2030, this number will rise to about 5.4 billion with the major part of the growth occurring in Asia. The 2.2 billion people entering the global middle class will aspire to a similar lifestyle as we know it today – which includes a similar consumption pattern with respect to clothing.”

CONTINUE READING HERE: https://news.un.org/en/story/2018/07/1014862

Resource title

4th Session on the Limits of the Continental Shelf

From 16 July to 3 August, and from 13-24 August, the Subcommissions will meet. From 6-10 August, and 27-31 August, the Plenary will convene. 

From 16 July to 3 August, and from 13-24 August, the Subcommissions will meet. From 6-10 August, and 27-31 August, the Plenary will convene.