Ocean Action Hub

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Internal compass for the implementation of SDG14
19 May 2017 - Putting local people and communities at the centre: UNDP Ocean Blog Series

Putting local people and communities at the centre

UNDP's Ocean Blog Series

19 May 2017 

by Sulan Chen, Programme Advisor- International Waters and Chemicals & Waste Management - UNDP

On 25 September 2015, world leaders adopted the comprehensive and ambitious Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Since then, life has continued and gone on on in thousands of communities around the world, for whom the SDGs are probably of little significance. Indeed, political declarations or statements, if left with no implementation on the ground, are barely anything more than good will. If, on the other hand, SDGs are people-centered, the focus should be on local people, communities and the ecosystems they rely on for their survival and prosperity. This, in my view, is the internal compass for the implementation of the SDGs.

Now that the upcoming Ocean Conference confronts the world to implement SDG 14: “Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development”, there is a need to strengthen its implementation at the local level. Guided by this internal compass, the Global Environment Facility Small Grants Programme (SGP) implemented by UNDP has provided financial resources and technical guidance to communities and civil society organizations for the environment and sustainable development.

SGP actions are community-based initiatives that attempt to simultaneously address poverty reduction, environment and community empowerment. In Malaysia, SGP supported an initiative to address accidental capture of sea turtles in commercial and artisanal fisheries. As nets roll along the seabed, they indiscriminately catch and drown numerous sea turtles. SGP supported the Marine Research Foundation to develop and implement a long-term national bycatch reduction programme in partnership with the Department of Fisheries of Malaysia.

This was achieved through the use of Turtle Excluder Devices (TEDs). The project worked directly with fishing communities in six key states in the country (Kelantan, Terengganu, Pahang, Johor, Sarawak and Sabah) and with the Department of Fisheries in Malaysia to introduce TEDs in coastal communities using demonstration trials, practical TED construction workshops, knowledge exchange sessions, and at-sea comparison trials, data gathering and sharing.

This project has had a profound impact on fisheries and bycatch reduction policy in Malaysia, and has led to the development of a GEF medium-sized project. Thanks to the project, which opened up a dialogue between the Governments of Malaysia and the Unites States, Malaysia intends to seek a Section 609 certification from the US State Department that would allow the export of shrimp fishery products to US markets.

Given the transboundary nature of ocean and coastal management, effective implementation of SDG 14 will require actions at the global, regional, national and local level, and ensure these actions are well aligned and coordinated to ultimately benefit local people, communities and the oceans.

Local actions, while direct and effective, may be constrained by their scale, scope and coverage, hence generating limited impact. Recognizing the importance of scaling up local actions, SGP has partnered with UNDP, UNEP and the World Bank in the Caribbean large marine ecosystem, the South China Sea and Gulf of Thailand, the Nile River and other international waterbodies to ensure local experiences and lessons learnt are taken into consideration at the regional level.

Only through effective inclusive partnerships that build upon a shared vision placing people, communities and planet at the center do have we a chance to achieve the SDGs. Guided by this internal compass, GEF SGP will continue its efforts to protect the oceans and serve local people and communities.

CONTINUE READING: http://www.undp.org/content/undp/en/home/blog/2017/5/19/Internal-compass-for-the-implementation-of-SDG-14-putting-local-people-and-communities-at-the-center-.html

PHOTO: In Malaysia, the Small Grants Programme supported an initiative to address accidental capture of sea turtles in commercial and artisanal fisheries. Photo: SGP Malaysia

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Senegal Ocean National Consultation

24 May 2017 - The Government of Senegal, with the support of UNDP, is holding the Ocean National Consultation on the implementation of SDG 14 today in Dakar.

24 May 2017

Direction des Pêches Maritimes, Dakar

The Government of Senegal, with the support of UNDP, is holding the Ocean National Consultation on the implementation of SDG 14 today in Dakar.

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Convention de Concession des Droits de Peche et de gestion de la pecherie de crevettes profones de Senegal

Entre le Ministere de la Peche et de l'Economie Maritime (MPEM) et La Cooperative Senegalaise des Exploitants de Crevettes Profondes (COSECPRO) 

16 June 2015

Convention de Concession des Droits de Peche et de gestion de la pecherie de crevettes profones de Senegal entre le Ministere de la Peche et de l'Economie Maritime (MPEM) et La Cooperative Senegalaise des Exploitants de Crevettes Profondes (COSECPRO) 

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Presentation: Initiatives in the Implementation of SDG 14 - M. Luqman Magho, Environment Officer, Environment and Sustainable Development Division

18 May 2017 - Presented at a 

18 May 2017 - Presented at a two-day preparatory workshop ahead of The Ocean Conference, aiming at the successful implementation of the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 14, was held on 17-18 May 2017 in Balaclava.

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Bangladesh Interfaces with the Ocean (SDG 14): Concept paper for the Ocean Conference, 5-9 June 2017
22 May 2017 - Concept paper for the Ocean Conference and the national consultation held on 1 June 2017 to prepare Bangladesh's position.

22 May 2017 - Concept paper for the UN Ocean Conference 2017 for the national consultation held on 1 June 2017 to prepare Bangladesh's position for the conference.

 Download Bangladesh concept paper-ocean national consultation - 22 May 2017.pdf (287.1 KB)

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About Fiji and SDG 14
16 May 2017 - Like any SIDS, Fiji continues to face key challenges in the sustainable management of its marine and coastal ecosystems. 

16 May 2017 - Located in the heart of the Pacific Ocean, Fiji is blessed with around 300 tropical islands that are home to some of the happiest people on Earth.

Fiji is an island nation with more than 50 per cent of the total population living along the coast, heavily dependent on subsistence fishing, whose fisheries and aquaculture contribute to more than $136 million towards GDP. At the same time, Fiji is losing more than two percent of her coral reefs per year.

Fiji, like any other Small Island Developing State (SIDS), acknowledges that our ocean is in great danger. Covering 72 percent of the Earth and supplying half its oxygen, the people of Fiji appreciate that the ocean is our planet's life support system. In one way or another, we are all connected to the ocean regardless of where we are from. Our planet depends on the vitality of the ocean to support and sustain it.

Unfortunately, our ocean faces major threats: global climate change, pollution, habitat destruction and a dramatic decrease in ocean fish stocks. These threats are so extensive that more than 40 percent of the ocean has been severely affected. Consequently, humanity is losing the food, jobs, and critical environmental services that a healthy ocean generates.

The sustainable use and preservation of marine and coastal ecosystems and their biological diversity is essential to achieving the 2030 Agenda, especially in SIDS. Like any SIDS, Fiji continues to face key challenges in the sustainable management of its marine and coastal ecosystems. These challenges can be framed broadly under the three categories of: policy and institutional coherence, data and information sharing and sustainable oceans management approach.

In June 2017, Fiji will co-preside with Sweden the Oceans Conference in New York. This is the first of the High Level Conferences on one of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals. The overarching theme of the Conference is, 'Our oceans, our future: partnering for the implementation of Sustainable Development Goal 14'. The significance of this event and this SDG is not only obvious but our very survival as humanity depends on it. 

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Madagascar, l’île rouge de l’Océan Indien - the “Red Island” of the Indian Ocean
le 3 mai 2017 - Avec un espace maritime d’une étendue de deux fois sa superficie terrestre, l’ODD #14 est d’une importance cruciale pour le développement de Madagascar.

English version below

le 3 mai 2017 - Large de 587 000 km2, Madagascar est la cinquième plus grande île au monde. Le canal du Mozambique la sépare d’environ 400km des côtes Est de l’Afrique dont elle fait partie. La couleur rouge ocre de ses collines lui confère le surnom d’île rouge.

Madagascar s’est engagé dans le processus de l’Agenda 2030 pour le développement durable qui est le référentiel de développement mondial pour les quinze prochaines années afin d’en finir avec l’extrême pauvreté, lutter contre l’injustice et les inégalités, et faire face au changement climatique.

Avec un espace maritime d’une étendue de deux fois sa superficie terrestre, l’ODD #14 est d’une importance cruciale pour le développement de Madagascar. Au plus haut niveau des autorités du pays, l’appropriation du processus est de mise pour la réalisation de cet objectif et de ses interactions avec les 16 autres objectifs de développement durable.

A ce titre, Madagascar s’est déjà engagé pour l’exploitation et la gestion durable des océans à travers la ratification de textes et des déclarations lors de rencontres internationales ; la Convention de Nairobi, La Promesse de Sydney, ou encore la COP21 pour ne citer que celles là.

Alors que Madagascar est en phase de finaliser à ce jour son processus de priorisation des ODD, le Rapport sur les Valeurs Economiques de l’Océan Indien Occidental et la Vision de Madagascar sur la Gouvernance de l’Océan ont permis de révéler les 4 axes majeurs illustrant le positionnement du pays vis à vis de l’ODD #14. Il peuvent être traduits comme suit :

  • Une bonne gouvernance de l’espace maritime ;
  • Un Etat souverain dans ses espaces maritimes ;
  • Un espace maritime et des ressources marines sécurisées ;
  • Une économie maritime nationale puissante : économie bleue.

La prochaine étape pour Madagascar est de coupler ses engagements internationaux à l’ambition du pays de mettre en place un cadre de référence stratégique de toutes les interventions contribuant aux cibles de l’ODD #14, mais aussi de finaliser de manière inclusive les engagements qui seront pris par le pays. Une task force a été ainsi mise en place afin de coordonner et structurer les contributions de chaque acteur national à ce cadre de référence stratégique, mais également de mettre en place une bonne structure de gouvernance relative à la mise en œuvre de l’ODD 14, tout en pilotant la participation active de Madagascar à la Conférence Mondiale de l’ONU sur les Océans en juin 2017.

Cette task force est composée de départements publics de Madagascar, du réseau MIHARI et de WWF.

Le processus devant conduire à ces résultats est basé sur une approche intégrée incluant les communautés locales, les acteurs directs et le gouvernement de Madagascar. Une série de trois consultations nationales auront lieux au mois de Mai, avec l’appui du Programme des Nations Unies pour le Développement, afin de jeter les premières pierres de ce cadre stratégique et dégager les engagements pris par Madagascar. 

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Madagascar, the “Red Island” of the Indian Ocean

3 May 2017 - At 587,000 km2, Madagascar is the world’s fifth-largest island. Separated from the East African coast by the 400 km-wide Mozambique Channel, its red ochre hills give it the nickname “Red Island”.

Madagascar is committed to Agenda 2030 for Sustainable Development, the global development benchmark for the next fifteen years, focused on ending extreme poverty, fighting inequality and injustice, and combatting climate change.

With a maritime area ​​twice its land area, Sustainable Development Goal (SGD) 14 is crucially important for Madagascar’s development. At the highest level of the national authorities, ownership of the process is key to achieving Goal 14 and its interactions with the other 16 SDGs.

To this end, Madagascar has already made commitments on the sustainable use and management of the oceans, through the ratification of international texts and declarations, including The Nairobi Convention, the Sydney Promise and COP21, among others.

While work on prioritizing SDG targets in Madagascar is progressing, the ‘Report on the Western Indian Ocean’s Economic Values’ and ‘Madagascar’s Ocean Governance Vision’ have identified the four major axes indicating the country's position toward SDG 14:

  1. Good governance of maritime areas;
  2. A sovereign State in its maritime areas;
  3. Maritime areas and resources secured;
  4. A powerful national maritime economy: the Blue Economy.

Madagascar’s next step is to link its international commitments to the country’s ambition to set up a strategic reference framework for all interventions contributing to the SDG 14 targets, as well as to finalize the commitments to be taken by the country.

A taskforce has been created to coordinate the contributions of each national stakeholder to this strategic reference framework, as well as to set up a good governance structure for SDG 14 implementation, while leading Madagascar’s active participation in the Ocean Conference, to be held in June 2017. This task force is composed of Madagascan public departments, the Madagascar Locally Managed Marine Area Network (MIHARI) and the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF).

The process leading to these results is based on an integrated approach involving local communities, direct actors and the Government of Madagascar. A series of three national consultations will be held in May 2017, with the support of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), in order to lay the foundation for this strategic framework and to identify the voluntary commitments to be made by Madagascar.