Ocean Action Hub

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5 Pillars of a New Ocean Agenda

8 Dec 2020 - 2020 was supposed to be a super year for the ocean. Nicola Frost and Kristian Teleki lay out the types of actions they expect to see as part of the new ocean agenda.

8 Dec 2020 - Nicola Frost and Kristian Teleki  - 2020 was supposed to be a super year for the ocean. A packed calendar of international events should have presented opportunities to assess progress towards Sustainable Development Goal 14 to conserve and sustainably use ocean resources; renew expiring Aichi Targets to protect coastal and marine habitats; conclude negotiations on a legally binding international agreement for the conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity in the high seas; and reach agreement to prohibit fishing subsidies that drive overfishing and illegal practices. The coronavirus pandemic, however, brought a very different backdrop to 2020, delaying these important events at a time when improving ocean health has never been more paramount.

The ocean economy contributes upwards of $1.5 trillion in value to the global economy. It provides food to more than 3 billion people. And it supports hundreds of millions of jobs in tourism, fishing and transportation.

Yet the health of the ocean is off track. The ocean is under intense and growing pressure from pollution, overfishing, unsustainable development and climate change.

CONTINUE READING ONLINE HERE: https://www.wri.org/blog/2020/12/new-ocean-action-agenda?utm_medium=promoted&utm_source=twitter&utm_campaign=socialmedia

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Harnessing the Power of the Ocean Data Revolution

10 Feb 2020 - In this era of upheaval in the ocean, driven by climate change and other stressors, technological innovations offer a flood of new data and new capabilities for translating i

10 Feb 2020 - In this era of upheaval in the ocean, driven by climate change and other stressors, technological innovations offer a flood of new data and new capabilities for translating it into actionable information. From an exponential increase in the number and variety of ocean observing systems, new data sources like social media, and advances in processing techniques and visualisation, we now know more about the ocean than we’ve ever known before.

These innovations offer unprecedented potential to improve stewardship of ocean resources and ensure resilient and productive ecosystems. There’s just one problem: Most ocean data stemming from such innovations remains locked away, closely held by government agencies, companies, resource users or researchers.

Through its Decade of Ocean Science, which begins next year, the UN has recognized that the world needs more actionable information to achieve Sustainable Development Goal 14, which seeks to conserve and sustainably use the ocean, seas and marine resources.  The UN Decade for Ocean Science presents an opportunity to leverage technological developments and make new sources of data widely known, applied and available. The data revolution could be coming to the ocean just in time.

A new paper, prepared by leading experts in support of the High Level Panel for a Sustainable Ocean Economy, found that seizing the opportunity offered by the ocean data revolution requires high-level, global action. Three key actions can build on the UN Decade of Ocean Science to create an open, actionable and equitable digital ecosystem for the ocean.

CONTINUE READING ONLINE HERE: https://www.wri.org/blog/2020/01/harnessing-the-ocean-data-revolution?utm_campaign=socialmedia&utm_source=HLPBluePaper&utm_medium=OceanTech

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Fast-tracking Law-abiding Ships at Ports Could Help End Illegal Fishing

7 Feb 2020 - In 2015 SDG 14.4 to end illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing by 2020 was seen as an achievable target, it is now a deadline we’re going to miss. But we have a suite of tools with which to take on IUU fishers.

 

7 Feb 2020 - When the UN launched the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) five years ago, the world aligned around the need to end illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing by 2020 (SDG 14.4). Seen then as an achievable target, it is now a deadline we’re going to miss.

IUU fishing accounts for nearly 20% of the world catch; up to 50% in some areas, with poorer coastal states disproportionately affected. In the Pacific Ocean, a report estimated 24% of the fish are unreported and illegally traded in international markets. This directly leads to $4.3-8.3 billion of loss in gross revenues every year to the formal economy, and up to $21 billion per year across the fish value chain. In addition, destructive fishing methods and deceptive practices are being used to reap profits at the expense of local fisheries, coastal states and the marine environment. In some cases, IUU fishers are associated with crimes including drugs, weapons and human rights abuses.

The problem stands to worsen. Climate change is expected to decrease the quantity of fish available globally and alter where they can be caught. At the same time, global consumption and demand for seafood is projected to increase by 20% (30 million tonnes) by 2030, particularly in developing nations. Conflicts over increasingly scarce resources have already begun, such as in Sierra Leone, where skirmishes between artisanal fishers and larger IUU trawlers are common.

That’s the bad news. The good news is that we have a suite of tools with which to take on IUU fishers.

CONTINUE READING ONLINE HERE: https://www.wri.org/blog/2020/02/fast-tracking-law-abiding-ships-ports-could-help-end-illegal-fishing

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How do we feed nearly 10 billion people by 2050?

19 Jul 2019 - The 2019 World Resources Report launched today looks at five "courses" to achieve a “sustainable food future” including increasing fish consumption and suppl

19 Jul 2019 - The 2019 World Resources Report launched today looks at five "courses" to achieve a “sustainable food future” including increasing fish consumption and supply. Read the full report from UNDP, WRI, the World Bank, UN Environment, INRAD and CIRAD.

Fish, including finfish and shellfish, provide only small percentages of total global calories and protein, but they contribute 17 percent of animal-based protein, and are particularly important for more than 3 billion people in developing countries. We project fish consumption to rise 58 percent between 2010 and 2050, but the wild fish catch peaked at 94 million tons in the mid-1990s and has since stagnated or perhaps declined. This course proposes ways to improve wild fisheries management and raise the productivity and environmental performance of aquaculture.

CONTINUE READING ONLINE HERE: http://www.sustainablefoodfuture.org/course/increase-fish-supply-synthesis

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6 Recent Signs of Hope for the Ocean

1 May 2019 - Kristian Teleki - It’s easy to lose sight of good news amid the barrage of negative stories about the threats facing the ocean—everything from growing plastic pollution to dyi

1 May 2019 - Kristian Teleki - It’s easy to lose sight of good news amid the barrage of negative stories about the threats facing the ocean—everything from growing plastic pollution to dying coral reefs. However, there is a lot to celebrate when you look more closely at ocean-related developments.

Over the past few years, the ocean has been rising rapidly on the international agenda, powered by the recognition that we need major change to secure ocean health as a basis for generating ocean wealth (in other words, sustainable development). People are increasingly realizing that the ocean is essential to life on this planet, providing oxygen and food, controlling the weather, absorbing excess carbon emissions and supporting entire industries and millions of jobs.

Now, governments and industries are joining forces for ocean solutions. New approaches to the ocean are allowing production and protection to operate together. Here are just a few recent positive developments:

1. Indonesian Government and Partners Tackle Plastic Pollution

The Indonesian government, which in 2017 pledged $1 billion a year to reduce marine debris 70 percent by 2025, recently teamed up with the Global Plastic Action Partnership (GPAP) to take an innovative and data-driven approach to solving the ocean plastic crisis.

Hosted by the World Economic Forum, GPAP aims to redesign the global "take-make-dispose" economy into a circular one.

The GPAP team in Jakarta is collecting local waste management data and building a model that evaluates solutions such as reducing overpackaging, substituting materials, creating new recyclable plastics, increasing recycling rates and improving waste collection rates.

For each solution, the model will estimate the investment needed, timeline, environmental footprint and greenhouse gas emissions, as well as the impact on people's lives. The partnership aims to deploy solutions that could eventually be replicated in other countries.

CONTINE READING ONLINE HERE: https://www.wri.org/blog/2019/05/6-recent-signs-hope-ocean?utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=worldresources&utm_campaign=socialmedia

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Heads of Government Unite for the Ocean and People Who Depend on it
25 Sept 2018 - NEW YORK - 12 World Leaders Form New High Level Panel for a Sustainable Ocean Economy

12 World Leaders Form New High Level Panel for a Sustainable Ocean Economy

NEW YORK (SEPTEMBER 24, 2018)—A group of world leaders came together in New York City today to form a panel that will assess the value of Ocean goods and services in economic planning and support the sustainable use of Ocean resources. Co-chaired by the Prime Minister of Norway Erna Solberg and President of the Republic of Palau Tommy Esang Remengesau, Jr., the High Level Panel for a Sustainable Ocean Economy consists of 12 heads of government and the UN Secretary-General’s Special Envoy for the Ocean. This marks the first time serving heads of government have joined forces on a global pact to protect the world’s Ocean.

Goods and services from the Ocean amount to about US$2.5 trillion each year—an amount expected to double by 2030. The Ocean supports a multitude of industries, including fishing, shipping, transportation, energy generation and tourism, and is of increasing interest to mining and biomedical companies. The Ocean feeds 3 billion people, who depend on the sea for their primary source of protein.

Speaking at the Panel’s first meeting, Co-Chair and Norwegian Prime Minister Erna Solberg said: “We are dependent on a clean and healthy Ocean, and all use of marine resources must be sustainable. As the only Ocean policy body consisting of serving world leaders, we have the authority and determination needed to trigger and accelerate action for Ocean protection and production. We need to find common solutions – to develop and implement comprehensive, effective regulation and an integrated Ocean management regime. This is truly a test of our ability to deliver a healthier planet and Ocean to the next generation.”

The Ocean is in danger—pollution, overfishing, microplastics, rising sea temperatures and coral bleaching put the Ocean economy and the people who depend on it at risk.

With 80 percent of people living within 100km of the Ocean and three-quarters of the world's mega-cities by the sea, as much as 40 percent of the Ocean is already heavily affected by pollution, depleted fisheries, loss of coastal habitats and other human activities. In fact, should practices not change within 10 years, experts project that the Ocean will contain an estimated 1kg of plastic for every 3kg of fish.

Co-Chair and President of the Republic of Palau Tommy Remengesau, Jr. said: "For Palau, the Ocean is at the center of our life, culture, and identity. Its capacity to provide for our needs is immense, but it is not without limits. Humanity must learn the lessons of small islands and respect our Ocean, or we risk losing many of its gifts for good.”

The Panel is made up of leaders from Australia, Chile, Fiji, Ghana, Indonesia, Jamaica, Japan, Mexico, Namibia, Norway, Palau and Portugal.

Panel leaders will also work to achieve the UN Sustainable Development Goals by emphasizing the fundamental role that a sustainable Ocean economy must play in achieving sustainable development.

Over the next 18 months, the Panel will commission research on evidence-based solutions to the Ocean crisis and how to address it. This will include a series of “Blue Papers” by global experts exploring issues such as sustainable fisheries, Ocean-based energy solutions and tourism, as well as new approaches to Marine Protected Areas and Ocean finance. The papers will inform an action-oriented report to be released in 2020.

The panel will pursue three overarching goals:

  • A shared understanding of the relationship between the Ocean and the economy;
  • A recognition that economic production and Ocean protection must be mutually supporting—the world must “produce and protect,” striking a balance between use and conservation of the Ocean; and
  • A suite of innovations in policy, governance, markets and incentives that will align robust economic development with protection of the underlying natural capital of the Ocean.

CONTINUE READING ONLINE HERE: https://www.wri.org/news/2018/09/release-heads-government-unite-ocean-and-people-who-depend-it?utm_campaign=socialmedia&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_medium=worldresources&utm_content=photo

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Eutrophication and Hypoxia in Coastal Areas: A Global Assessment of the State of Knowledge

This report identifies over 415 areas worldwide that are experiencing eutrophication symptoms - the over-enrichment of water by nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphor - and the significant informa

tion gaps in many regions.

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