Ocean Action Hub

24 Mar 2017 - It’s an image nobody wants to see: the body of a majestic blue whale, lying limp over the bow of a massive cargo vessel, or washed up on a beach, fatally wounded from what’s commonly known as a “ship strike.”

The collisions have become all too frequent, as ship traffic proliferates along migratory whale routes and feeding areas. Reports of whales being struck and killed in such impacts have increased dramatically in the past 50 years.

Hoping to mitigate this growing problem, the Benioff Ocean Initiative at UC Santa Barbara has committed $1.5 million to accelerate research aimed at finding and implementing new solutions to curtail ship strikes and reduce whale mortality.

The project is the first in a series of research-based ocean solution campaigns that will be run by the Benioff Ocean Initiative. The initiative began this inaugural effort by releasing a global call for ocean scientists and technologists to submit proposals for seed funding to identify innovative resolutions that will meaningfully reduce ship collisions with whales. Organizers expect many of the resulting ideas will involve the design or adaptation of new technologies that can be replicated across the globe.

“I think this is an incredibly important problem to address,” said Douglas McCauley, director of the Benioff Ocean Initiative and an assistant professor in UCSB’s Department of Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology. “These collisions are impacting some of the most endangered and spectacular whales on the planet.”

Ship strikes are cited as a top source of mortality for a variety of at-risk whale species and are believed to be a major obstacle in preventing their population recovery. On the West Coast of the United States, blue whales are of particular concern in vessel strikes because of their large size and tendency to seasonally aggregate in feeding grounds.

“Blue whales are the largest animal that has ever lived — they are bigger than the dinosaurs,” McCauley said. “They pump blood with a car-sized heart through arteries that are large enough for a diver to swim through. This is an animal whose future we want to protect.”

Researchers estimate that 10 blue whales were killed every year during the late 2000s in the Santa Barbara Channel alone — a matter of major consequence for a species whose population today is just 3 to 11 percent of their historic, pre-industrial whaling abundance. Losses of these marine megafauna are significant, as whales play important ecological roles as movers of nutrients, consumers of prey and engineers of marine ecosystems.

The Benioff Ocean Initiative was founded in 2016 with an initial gift of $10 million from Lynne and Marc Benioff, chairman and CEO of Salesforce. The experimental enterprise aims to combine university researchers, students and global ocean communities to identify problems and solve them with emerging technologies.

The announcement of the whale collision project, made Thursday at the opening of the World Economic Forum center in San Francisco, reflects part of the ongoing collaboration between UCSB and the forum to advance ocean change.

CONTINUE READING: https://www.noozhawk.com/article/save_the_whales_benioff_ocean_initiativ...

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Publication date: 
24/03/2017
Publication Organisation: 
NoozHawk
Publication Author: 
Shelly Leachman
Thematic Area: 
Marine ecosystems
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