Ocean Action Hub

Marine and coastal ecosystems provide many services to human society, including food and other goods, shoreline protection, water quality maintenance, waste treatment, support of tourism and other cultural benefits, and maintenance of the basic global life support systems.

The provision of these services is threatened by the worldwide degradation of marine and coastal ecosystems. Fisheries are in global decline. Coastal habitats have been modified and lost, and in many cases the rate of degradation is increasing. Habitat loss and modification result in a loss of ecosystem services and also threaten biodiversity (UNEP, 2006, p. 7).

Latest

4 Jun 2019 - Worldwide, coral is dying because of rising sea temperatures, industrial pollution, plastic pollution, overfishing, sewage, chemical sunscreens and unmanaged high-density tourism. Here’s what you can do — as a traveler and citizen — to help.

Approved

30 May 2019 - The Indonesian government has established three new marine protected areas within the Coral Triangle, home to the highest diversity of corals and reef fishes anywhere on the

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22 April 2019 - NatGeo - As temperatures creep higher, marine animals are far more vulnerable to extinctions than their earthbound counterparts, according to a new analysis of more than 400 cold-blooded species.

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21 May 2019 - Across the globe, hundreds of areas with world-class surfing waves also contain a variety of diverse marine species.

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20 May 2019 - The Report demonstrates slow progress on Goals including SDGs 14 and 15 with biodiversity being lost “at an alarming rate” with one million species facing extinction and invasive species and illegal wildlife trafficking continue to undermine efforts to protect and restore ecosystems and species. 

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8 May 2019 - New approaches to the ocean are allowing production and protection to operate together.

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29 Apr 2019 - The plastic pollution that end up in the Earth's oceans is costing world governments as much as $2.5 trillion a year.

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26 Apr 2019 - Researchers point toward marine creatures’ inability to adapt to changing water temperatures, lack of adequate shelter.

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25 Apr 2019 - Chile plans to use this year’s UN climate talks to focus attention on the world’s most important carbon sponge – the oceans.

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24 Apr 2019 - Scientists are beginning to recognize that vertebrates, such as fish, seabirds and marine mammals, have the potential to help lock away carbon from the atmosphere.

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The 9th Trondheim Conference aims to discuss the global biodiversity framework being developed as a follow up to the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011-2020.

Event Date:
02/07/2019 - 09:00 to 05/07/2019 - 18:00
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23 Apr 2019 - We need a new business model that shifts the industrial approach of "take, make, dispose" to a more circular approach, where products are recycled, upcycled and reused.

Approved