Ocean Action Hub

Land-based sources (such as agricultural run-off, discharge of nutrients and pesticides and untreated sewage including plastics) account for approximately 80% of marine pollution, globally. Marine habitats worldwide are contaminated with man-made debris. Oil spills remain a concern, though actual spills have decreased steadily for several decades. SDG 14.1 calls for the prevention and significant reduction of marine pollution of all kinds, in particular from land-based activities, including marine debris and nutrient pollution, by 2025.

Excessive nutrients from sewage outfalls and agricultural runoff have contributed to the increasing incidence of low oxygen (hypoxic) areas known as dead zones, where most marine life cannot survive, resulting in the collapse of some ecosystems. There are now close to 500 dead zones with a total global surface area of over 245,000 km², roughly equivalent to that of the United Kingdom. The excess nitrogen can also stimulate the proliferation of seaweeds and microorganisms and cause algal blooms. Such blooms can be harmful (HABs), causing massive fish kills, contaminating seafood with toxins and altering ecosystems.

Litter can accumulate in huge floating garbage patches or wash up on the coasts. Light, resistant plastics float in the Ocean, releasing contaminants as they break down into micro-particles that animals mistake for food. Fish and birds can choke on these particles, get sick as they accumulate toxins in their stomachs, or become entangled in larger debris.

As the world saw in 2010, the Gulf of Mexico deep-water oil spill had a devastating effect on the entire marine ecosystem, as well as the populations that depend on the marine areas for their livelihoods. Smaller oil spills happen every day, due to drilling incidents or leaking motors, negatively impacting birds, marine mammals, algae, fish and shellfish.

SOURCE: UNESCO website

Latest

24 Jun 2019 - The amount of plastic found deep in the ocean disturbed K. V. Priyesh enough to take action, and his efforts inspired others.

Approved

17 Jun 2019 - Plastic waste is impacting our oceans and our land on a massive scale. The urgency of the moment calls for all players to contribute to the effort.

Approved

14 Jun 2019 - Two American senators come together across party lines to protect the ocean with a new law passed to address dumping of waste and debris in the ocean. Read their blog:

Approved
11 Jun 2019 - This publication captures the GEF Small Grant Programme's (SGP)...
Approved

5 Jun 2019 - Take a moment of respite from the daily news about biodiversity loss and our climate crisis to discover bright, bold solutions that point us toward the future

Approved

4 Jun 2019 - Worldwide, coral is dying because of rising sea temperatures, industrial pollution, plastic pollution, overfishing, sewage, chemical sunscreens and unmanaged high-density tourism. Here’s what you can do — as a traveler and citizen — to help.

Approved

3 June 2019 - Concert aims to raise awarness of reducing ocean plastic, part of initiative by UN General Assembley President. 

Approved

24 May 2019 - WWF has launched an “activation hub” to help companies and organizations translate commitments to reduce or eliminate plastic into measurable action. The hub is part of WWF’s global ‘No Plastic in Nature’ campaign, which tackles marine litter and plastic consumption as part of efforts to protect the world’s biodiversity and oceans.

Approved

17 May 2019 - NY Times - A new survey of remote islands off the coast of Australia found mountains of plastic weighing as much as a blue whale.

Approved

14 May 2019 - Almost all governments have agreed to include plastic waste in a legally-binding framework to better regulate its global trade, and launched a new 'Partnership on Plastic Waste' in support.

Approved

8 May 2019 - New approaches to the ocean are allowing production and protection to operate together.

Approved

3 May 2019 - Low-cost acoustic tags attached to fishing nets are being trialled as part of a major new project to reduce marine litter and 'ghost fishing'.

Approved
socrates