Ocean Action Hub

Land-based sources (such as agricultural run-off, discharge of nutrients and pesticides and untreated sewage including plastics) account for approximately 80% of marine pollution, globally. Marine habitats worldwide are contaminated with man-made debris. Oil spills remain a concern, though actual spills have decreased steadily for several decades. SDG 14.1 calls for the prevention and significant reduction of marine pollution of all kinds, in particular from land-based activities, including marine debris and nutrient pollution, by 2025.

Excessive nutrients from sewage outfalls and agricultural runoff have contributed to the increasing incidence of low oxygen (hypoxic) areas known as dead zones, where most marine life cannot survive, resulting in the collapse of some ecosystems. There are now close to 500 dead zones with a total global surface area of over 245,000 km², roughly equivalent to that of the United Kingdom. The excess nitrogen can also stimulate the proliferation of seaweeds and microorganisms and cause algal blooms. Such blooms can be harmful (HABs), causing massive fish kills, contaminating seafood with toxins and altering ecosystems.

Litter can accumulate in huge floating garbage patches or wash up on the coasts. Light, resistant plastics float in the Ocean, releasing contaminants as they break down into micro-particles that animals mistake for food. Fish and birds can choke on these particles, get sick as they accumulate toxins in their stomachs, or become entangled in larger debris.

As the world saw in 2010, the Gulf of Mexico deep-water oil spill had a devastating effect on the entire marine ecosystem, as well as the populations that depend on the marine areas for their livelihoods. Smaller oil spills happen every day, due to drilling incidents or leaking motors, negatively impacting birds, marine mammals, algae, fish and shellfish.

SOURCE: UNESCO website

Latest

22 Aug 2018 - Did you know that the choices your local grocery store makes can have a global impact on the environment?

Approved

20 Aug 2018 - New research suggests that millions of contact lenses may be ending up in U.S. water supplies each year, contributing to ocean pollution.

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8 Aug 2018 - Denim made from ocean-trash plastic? Recycled fishnets? Meet the wave of the future.

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2 Aug 2018 - A sustainable fashion brand has created a footwear range made from single-use plastics collected from the ocean floor.

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29 Jul 2018 - The company also said it would stop using "virgin" plastic in its offices, shops, warehouses and distribution centers, saving an estimated 40 tons of plastic per year.

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25 Jul 2018 - Ulzii and other women living nearby support themselves by making brooms and household furniture such as chairs and sofas from plastic litter that they collect in the streets.

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Bali, Indonesia. Intergovernmental Review Meetings (IGR) are organised every 5 years.

Event Date:
31/10/2018 - 09:30 to 01/11/2018 - 17:30
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23 July 2018 - Abandoned fishing nets in our oceans are a big problem. Every year, more than 600,000 tonnes of nets are lost into the oceans.

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17 Jul 2018 - Clothing has been identified as a major polluter, with plastic microfibers ending up in the ocean as polyester, nylon and acrylic are washed.
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1:15 PM - 2:45 PM

Location: Permanent Mission of Sweden to the United Nations, 885 Second Avenue, 46th floor, New York, NY, USA

Event Date:
16/07/2018 - 13:15 to 14:45
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13 Jul 2018 - A one-stop shop for ocean literacy sharing existing global ocean...
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6 Jul 2018 - Fisherman in India’s southern state of Kerala are taking on the battle to cut the level of plastic waste in the oceans.

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