Ocean Action Hub
[ SDG Target 14.3 ] Minimize and address the impacts of ocean acidification, including through enhanced scientific cooperation at all levels.
 

Definition

Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) levels are rising as a result of human activities, such as fossil fuel burning, and are increasing the acidity of seawater. This process is known as ocean acidification. Historically, the ocean has absorbed approximately 30% of all CO2 released into the atmosphere by humans since the start of the industrial revolution, resulting in a 26% increase in the acidity of the ocean (average global decrease in ocean pH of about 0.1 unit).

Ocean acidification makes it more difficult for the numerous organisms that fix calcium carbonate in their skeletons and shells to do so, and can also impact metabolic and reproductive processes in many marine species. By impacting marine ecosystems at multiple levels, it has significant potential to affect food security and livelihoods that depend upon healthy marine ecosystems. The economic impact of ocean acidification could be substantial.

Reducing CO2 emissions is the only way to minimize long-term, large-scale risks from ocean acidification (IGBP, IOC, SCOR, 2013, p. 1).

Latest

20 June 2019 - Take a deep dive into why and how toxic sunscreen chemicals are damaging the marine life, destinations that already banned toxic sunscreens, and what you can do to help protect both yourself and the corals of our oceans.

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10 June 2018 - By transplanting unrelated coral colonies onto permanent sites, marine biologists can ensure healthier cross-breeding and coral that are more resilient to disease and bleaching.

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28 May 2019 - The website allows users to click on any location in the global ocean and see the history of marine heatwaves from current day back to 1982.

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26 Apr 2019 - Researchers point toward marine creatures’ inability to adapt to changing water temperatures, lack of adequate shelter.

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25 Apr 2019 - Chile plans to use this year’s UN climate talks to focus attention on the world’s most important carbon sponge – the oceans.

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28 Mar 2019 - Researchers have determined how much human-made CO2 emissions the ocean took up between 1994 and 2007.

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The event highlights ocean-based science and engineering successes in the areas of resilience, adaptation, mitigation and sustainability and promote scalable solutions across human, climate and ecological dimensions.

Event Date:
01/04/2019 - 09:30 to 04/04/2019 - 11:30
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On 8 June every year, World Oceans Day provides a unique opportunity to honor, help protect, and conserve our world’s shared ocean. Register your event here.
Event Date:
08/06/2019 - 08:00 to 20:00
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22 Feb 2019 - IISD - Signatories to the Brussels Declaration on the ocean and climate change commit to continue developing, by 2020, an international legally binding instrument under the U

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18 Feb 2019 - “The ocean is under threat from pollution and plastics, from overfishing and habitat loss, from acidification, which threatens all life on Earth.” - Cody Simpson, UNDP Ocean Advocate

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7 Feb 2019 - IOC-UNESCO reports that the indicator methodology on how to conduct ocean acidification observation has been developed and trainings have begun on how to apply the methodology.

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17 Jan 2019 - The ocean soaks up 93 percent of the heat of climate change. But that heat has a big and long-lasting impact.

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