Ocean Action Hub

Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) levels are rising as a result of human activities, such as fossil fuel burning, and are increasing the acidity of seawater. This process is known as ocean acidification. Historically, the ocean has absorbed approximately 30% of all CO2 released into the atmosphere by humans since the start of the industrial revolution, resulting in a 26% increase in the acidity of the ocean (average global decrease in ocean pH of about 0.1 unit).

Ocean acidification makes it more difficult for the numerous organisms that fix calcium carbonate in their skeletons and shells to do so, and can also impact metabolic and reproductive processes in many marine species. By impacting marine ecosystems at multiple levels, it has significant potential to affect food security and livelihoods that depend upon healthy marine ecosystems. The economic impact of ocean acidification could be substantial.

Reducing CO2 emissions is the only way to minimize long-term, large-scale risks from ocean acidification (IGBP, IOC, SCOR, 2013, p. 1).

Latest

24 May 2018 - We need to act now to save biodiversity and ecosystems.

Approved

21 May 2018 - Peter Thomson on how a sustainable blue economy will feed and support future generations.

Approved

14 May 2018 - As climate change brings worsening threats, insurance may be a way to insure against ocean losses.

Approved

11 May 2018 - World Ocean's Day, the annual global event aimed at tackling some of the biggest threats facing our oceans, will take place on June 8, 2018.

Approved

4 May 2018 - Hawaii has become the first US state to pass a bill banning the sale of any sunscreens that have chemicals known to harm coral reefs.

Approved
27 Apr 2018 - Learn more about the serious problem of plastic in the ocean with this infographic.
Approved

UNDP Ocean Advocate, Australian singer-songwriter Cody Simpson, explains what nutrient pollution is and the risk it poses to marine life.

Approved

UNDP Ocean Advocate, Australian singer-songwriter Cody Simpson, talks about the chemical reactions that occur when CO2 is absorved by sea water.

Approved

24 April 2018 - 541 individual commitments include the provision of financial resources, with total financing amounting to approximately US$25.5 billion.

Approved

23 Apr 2018 - Harmful chemicals from sunscreen can leach into the ocean and damage coral. Here are some sun-blocking alternatives.

Approved

20 Apr 2018 - Earth Day is celebrated on 22 April since 1970.  This international day reminds us about the interdependence between natural ecosystems and human life.

Approved

18 Apr 2018 - The second meeting of the Sustainable Ocean Initiative (SOI) Global Dialogue with Regional Seas Organizations (RSOs) and Regional Fisheries Bodies (RFBs) on Accelerating Prog

Approved
socrates