Ocean Action Hub

Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) levels are rising as a result of human activities, such as fossil fuel burning, and are increasing the acidity of seawater. This process is known as ocean acidification. Historically, the ocean has absorbed approximately 30% of all CO2 released into the atmosphere by humans since the start of the industrial revolution, resulting in a 26% increase in the acidity of the ocean (average global decrease in ocean pH of about 0.1 unit).

Ocean acidification makes it more difficult for the numerous organisms that fix calcium carbonate in their skeletons and shells to do so, and can also impact metabolic and reproductive processes in many marine species. By impacting marine ecosystems at multiple levels, it has significant potential to affect food security and livelihoods that depend upon healthy marine ecosystems. The economic impact of ocean acidification could be substantial.

Reducing CO2 emissions is the only way to minimize long-term, large-scale risks from ocean acidification (IGBP, IOC, SCOR, 2013, p. 1).

Latest

15 Jan 2018 - A study published in Science last week reveals that severe bleaching of coral reefs is occurring twice as frequently compared to what it was in 1980.

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11 Jan 2018 - People around the world strongly support ocean conservation measures, according to a new study of public perceptions of marine threats and protection.

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10 Jan 2018 - As temperatures rise, oxygen levels in the ocean are falling, threatening marine life and coastal economies. But the only solution to deoxygenation is to dramatically reduce greenhouse gas emissions – and it may already be too late.

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9 January 2018 - The World Ocean Council is kicking off 2018 by partnering with the Sovereign Wealth Fund Institute (SWFI) to focus attention on ocean, coasts and islands at the annual SWFI Institutional Investor Forum (Santa Monica, California, 20-22 February).

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Brussels - "Implementing the UN 2030 Agenda: What role for marine science?"

Event Date:
06/12/2017 - 09:15 to 17:15
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29 Nov 2017 - Australia’s Great Barrier Reef is more resilient to climate change and better able to regenerate itself than previously thought, scientists have said. 

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Legendary ocean researcher Sylvia Earle shares astonishing images of the ocean -- and shocking stats about its rapid decline -- as she makes her TED Prize wish: that we will join her in protecting

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13 Nov 2017 - Action on plastic bag use has been taken across the UK, for instance, the 5p plastic bag charge in England has cut the use of plastic bags by over 80 per cent, or over nine billion in just one year, and our microbead ban will be one of the toughest in the world.

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9 Nov 2017 - Shortly after the launch of Google Earth, a band of oceanographers led by legendary ocean researcher Sylvia Earle stomped into Google’s headquarters in Mountain View, California.

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26 Oct 2017 - Climate change could lead to sea level rises that are larger, and happen more rapidly, than previously thought, according to a trio of new studies that reflect mounting conce

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25 Oct 2017 - The China-France Oceanography Satellite (CFOSAT) will improve forecasting of hurricanes and cyclones.

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24 Oct 2017 - Solutions to address human-induced “Ocean Change” are needed to save life in the ocean and reverse the cycle of decline in which it is caught, according to Fiji’s Ambassador

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