Ocean Action Hub

Oceans have always inspired and nurtured us. Their vastness has challenged our thinking and our ingenuity. They have made us sailors, navigators, explorers and scientists.

Parts of our oceans are less visited than outer space. At 11,035m deep, the Mariana Trench is so inhospitable that only three people have ever been there. The surface of Mars is mapped in much greater detail than most of the oceans.

In medieval times, map makers didn’t know what lived in the deep, so they drew monsters.

The modern truth is much more frightening.

Commercial overexploitation is so severe that 90% of fish stocks are either fully exploited, over exploited, or have collapsed entirely.

Astounding waste persists in the commercial fishing industry.

This is a slow moving ecological and financial catastrophe. Fishing provides jobs for 260 million people, almost half of them women.

About 15% of the animal protein for human needs comes from seafood. And yet astounding waste persists in commercial fishing.

One in three fish caught never makes it to the plate. 

One in three fish caught never makes it to the plate. Every year fisheries waste about 10 million tonnes of fish—enough to fill 4,500 Olympic-sized swimming pools.

Trafficking also poses a serious threat to life below water; the World Wildlife Fund estimates that 100 million tonnes of exotic fish are captured every year.

There is a slow moving ecological and financial catastrophe happening in the fishing industry, which provides jobs for 260 million people, almost half of them women. 

By 2100, without significant change, more than half the world’s marine species may face extinction.

Read the full visual narration on Shorthand

0
No votes yet
Publication date: 
11/04/2022
Keyword/s: 
sdg 14
Approved
socrates